Profile

Image Unavailable
Title: Dr
First Name: Susan
Surname: Griffiths
Position: Lecturer
Telephone: 01224 263238
Email:
ORCID: ORCID Icon https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5057-5625

Academic Background

  • M.A. (Hons) Psychology (University of Aberdeen)
  • PG.Dip. Research Methods, Psychology (University of Aberdeen)
  • Ph.D. Applied Cognitive Psychology (University of Aberdeen)
  • D.Clin.Psy. (University of Glasgow)

Teaching

  • Introductory Psychology – Year 1 (SS1018/1002)
  • Social Psychology – Year 4 (SS4008)
  • Clinical Psychology and Mental Health – Year 4 (SS4014)
  • Forensic Psychology – Year 4 (SS4029)

Other duties and responsibilities

  • Dissertation supervision – Year 4 (SS4006)
  • Personal Tutor (B.A. Applied Social Sciences & MSc. Applied Psychology)

Professional Background

Susan is interested in the real-world applications of psychological theory and her experience spans applied cognitive and clinical domains of psychology. Susan’s Ph.D. explored the effects of post-event information on eyewitness testimony and the final experiment of this project was undertaken at Flinders University, Adelaide. She has assisted on other eyewitness research projects at the University of Aberdeen including a range of participant groups (e.g. suggestibility in child eyewitnesses; the effects of emotion on memory in armed police officers) and has held a research post within the police service. Susan completed her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology in 2012, undertaking specialist placements in neuropsychology which provided invaluable applied experience in the field of human memory. Post-qualification, she worked as a Clinical Psychologist providing assessment and therapy for children with mental health, behavioural and cognitive difficulties.

Research Interests

Susan is primarily interested in eyewitness memory and research which seeks to further understand the factors which can impact upon the reliability and accuracy of eyewitness testimony and decision-making (e.g. interview procedures, misleading information, line-up administration, emotion, etc.). Her own previous research in this field has focussed on the effects of pre- and post-event information on eyewitness recall, confidence and decision-making during line-up administration.

Membership of Professional Bodies Chartered Member of the British Psychological Society (CPsychol).

Publications

Dixon, S. & Memon, A. (2005). The effect of post-identification feedback on the recall of crime and perpetrator details. Journal of Applied Cognitive Psychology, 19, 935-951.

Conference presentations

Dixon, S. (September, 2012). Understanding sleep problems in rehabilitation patients after stroke. Paper presented at the Division of Neuropsychology (Scotland) Research Event, Glasgow, Scotland.

Dixon, S., Memon, A., & Mearns, K. (April, 2006). The effect of co-witness feedback on eyewitnesses’ retrospective evaluations. Paper presented at the 33rd Australian Experimental Psychology Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

Dixon, S., Memon, A., & Mearns, K. (2005, July). Eyewitnesses’ perceptions of risk from potential crime scenarios. Paper presented at the Fifteenth European Conference on Psychology and Law, Vilnius, Lithuania.

Dixon, S. & Memon, A. (2003, July). The effect of post-identification feedback on the recall of crime and perpetrator details. Paper presented at the Fifth Biennial Meeting of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Memon, A., Dixon, S., Hulse, L., & Bartlett, J. (2003, July). The effects of post-identification feedback on the confidence and memory judgements of young adults and seniors. Paper presented at the Fifth Biennial Meeting of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Invited talks

Dixon, S. (9th June 2006). The effects of feedback on eyewitness decision-making and retrospective memory reports. Invited talk at the School of Psychology, Flinders University, Australia.

Dixon, S. (17th February 2006). Eyewitnesses’ perceptions of risk from potential crime scenarios. Invited talk at the Police Psychological Services Division, Singapore Police Headquarters.